Nutrition in the News

Nutrition in the News

Kellogg’s to Remove Artificial Ingredients by 2018 – Nestle, Kraft, Campbells , General Mills and now Kellogg’s. Cereal giant Kellogg announces they are working to remove artificial colors and flavors from cereals, snack bars and frozen foods by 2018. Good thing turmeric is trending.

 

Eating Spicy Food is Linked to a Longer Life – New research shows eating spicy food is associated with a reduced risk for death. The compound capsaicin found in chili peppers has been found to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects that could be linked to a decrease in heart disease, respiratory disease and cancers. Time to check out that new Tabasco restaurant in Louisiana.

 

Coca-Cola to Invest in Suja  – Remember those organic, cold-pressed juices that retailed for nearly $9 a bottle at Whole Foods? The multi-million dollar juice company is one of America’s most promising companies of 2015 and Coca-Cola wants in. Maybe obesity and diabetes aren’t just a result of lack of exercise.

 

Meet Tender: Tinder For Food – A new app developed by three Boston friends provides users with an endless scroll through the Internet’s images of food and recipes. Swipe left to discard or swipe right to save the recipe source link for later. And you thought Vegemite was addicting.

 

NASA is Growing Space Lettuce –  NASA has successfully grown lettuce in a zero-gravity environment using miniature greenhouses. Astronauts at the International Space Station recently feasted on their first place of space-grown leafy greens. Next thing you know, they’ll be making their own asparagus water to save $6.

 

The Rise of the Healthy-Eating Guru – An interesting article highlights the rise of nutrition and wellness blogger. While bloggers are certainly key influencers when it comes to public awareness of nutrition and healthy eating, the pursuit of wellness has developed into a business and it’s important to be on the lookout for misinformation and misrepresented truths. Experience in making a personal dietary change isn’t a guaranteed qualification to advise others about nutrition. Turns out, fruits and vegetables can’t cure brain cancer if you never really had it in the first place – just ask Belle Gibson of The Whole Pantry.

 

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